http://twitter.com/judemacdonald. She is also eager to add more people to the network she follows. Anyone wanting to make quick suggestions about our Website – from design, to new applications we might want to consider, to story ideas – please add the tag #section15.ca to become part of the conversation here: Realtime results for #section15.ca." /> http://twitter.com/judemacdonald. She is also eager to add more people to the network she follows. Anyone wanting to make quick suggestions about our Website – from design, to new applications we might want to consider, to story ideas – please add the tag #section15.ca to become part of the conversation here: Realtime results for #section15.ca." />
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section15.ca gets the twitters!

January 20, 2009

Would you like to follow what’s happening on section15.ca, and be a part of the site’s growth and change?

Editor Jude MacDonald is making regular updates on Twitter: http://twitter.com/judemacdonald

She is also eager to add more people to the network she follows.

Anyone wanting to make quick suggestions about our Website – from design, to new applications we might want to consider, to story ideas – please add the tag #section15.ca to become part of the conversation here:

Realtime results for #section15.ca

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